PH and AUS continue partnership through PAC member appointment


Australia and Philippines partner anew for agricultural research and development (R&D).

Dr. Reynaldo V. Ebora, Executive Director of the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST-PCAARRD) was recently appointed as a member of the Policy Advisory Council (PAC) of the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR).

The ACIAR PAC plays a key role in the planning and implementation of ACIAR’s international agricultural research portfolio. It also provides advice to Australia’s Foreign Minister on problems in the agriculture sector of developing countries and on the appropriate policies and programs to address the problems.

Ebora was appointed by the Australian Government through its Minister of Foreign Affairs, Honorable. Marise Payne. He was also appointed for his role and contribution in the agriculture, aquatic, and natural resources (AANR) sector. Ebora will serve as member of the ACIAR PAC for three years.

Effective July 17, 2020, Ebora will have the opportunity to ensure that concerns of the Philippine AANR sector will be considered in the agricultural research portfolio of ACIAR to consequently benefit our country’s research agencies, universities, farmers’ organizations, and other stakeholders in the private sector. It will also be a strategic venue for Ebora to share the Philippines’ experience and learn from Australia’s best practices in addressing agricultural issues and opportunities faced by small-holder farmers and fisherfolk.

PCAARRD and ACIAR have been strong partners for more than 36 years in terms of agricultural R&D and in promoting R&D results to advance agricultural competitiveness.

The partnership also strengthens the policy system and monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of the PCAARRD-ACIAR joint projects and programs. To date, PCAARRD and ACIAR continue to share a common objective to reduce poverty and concomitant hunger problems by investing in agricultural R&D (Cyrill S. Estimado, DOST-PCAARRD S&T Media Services).

TekPinoy.biz #31: Virgin Coconut Oil Processing

Matuto at kumita!
Cook your way to wealth

Have you ever wondered how you can reach financial freedom in spite of the COVID-19 pandemic?

If you are out of a job or desiring to leave one and feeling cooped up at home, there is a flavorful, easy way out.

“Kitang-Kita Na sa TekPinoy.biz Series of ITDI” is the turn of the year learning tool for you. Let the Industrial Technology Development Institute (DOST-ITDI) teach you 55 simple and cheap ways to prepare meat, fish, fruits, and vegetables. For the manly type – muscle up with 14 machine-based technologies.

Below is TekPinoy.biz #31: Virgin Coconut Oil Processing.

Color it water white – Virgin Coconut Oil

Years before the COVID-19 pandemic, a particular product has long been hitting headlines. Malicious information mongering has labeled virgin coconut oil or VCO a rouge.

Many have been badmouthing it incessantly. But as some are wont to say, you cannot put an outstanding product down.

Twenty years later, world businesses engaged in VCO processing continue to thrive. Indeed, two years before the world was captured in the public health nightmare that is the COVID-19 disease, the global virgin coconut oil market stood at $2.7 billion.

Barring its potential use as a supplemental treatment for COVID-19, VCO is riding on the back of increasing investments in the industry. Today, the water white oil is significantly used in the toiletry, food, and various industrial sectors. It is projected to grow by over 9 percent to reach $4.7 billion by 2024.

While the Asia-Pacific dominated the global VCO market in 2018, it is anticipated to maintain its dominant position until 2024 owing to the huge production of coconut in the region.

Some of the leading players in the global VCO market are Nutiva Inc., iTi Tropicals Inc., The Hain Celestial Group, Edward & Sons Trading Co., and Barlean’s in the USA; Sun Bio Naturals Pvt.
Ltd. in India; NMK Holdings Pvt. Ltd. in Sri Lanka; Greenville Agro Corporation in the Philippines; Jax Coco in Hong Kong; and Naturoca in Indonesia.

So what is virgin coconut oil or VCO?

VCO is a coconut oil that is extracted from a single press using fresh, mature coconut meat. Its oil is obtained by mechanical or natural means either with or without application of heat resulting in no alteration of the oil.

One might say, thus, that VCO is raw oil – fresh and unaltered with that peculiar nutty, coconut aroma and taste, and familiar water-white color.

At ITDI, two processes have been developed. These are the ITDI Modified Wet Process and the Dry Process. However, large volume processors will appreciate that the wet technology can process 500 nuts in eight hours, approximately 25-30 li of VCO.

With a monthly production of 625-750 li, processors can easily produce 30,000–36,000 bottles (250 ml/bot) per year.

Virgin Coconut Oil Processing is Series No. 31 of ITDI’s livelihood technologies under its “Kitang-kita Na sa TekPinoy.biz Series.” The online material is free and can be accessed at http://bit.ly/ITDILivelihoodSeries.

Parties can request for online techno demonstration of technologies included in the series.

For particulars, write or call:

Ms. Nelia Elisa C. Florendo
Chief Science Research Specialist
Technological Services Division Industrial Technology Development Institute
DOST Complex, Bicutan
Taguig City 1631, Metro Manila
Tel. No.: (02) 8837-2071 Local 2265

(AMGuevarra \DOST-ITDI S&T Media Service)

TekPinoy.biz #35: Fruit Wine Making

Matuto at kumita!

Cook your way to wealth

Have you ever wondered how you can reach financial freedom in spite of the COVID-19 pandemic? 

If you are out of a job or desiring to leave one and feeling cooped up at home, there is a flavorful, easy way out.

“Kitang-Kita Na sa TekPinoy.biz Series of ITDI” is the turn of the year learning tool for you. Let the Industrial Technology Development Institute (DOST-ITDI) teach you 55 simple and cheap ways to prepare meat, fish, fruits, and vegetables. For the manly type – muscle up with 14 machine-based technologies. 

Below is TekPinoy.biz #35: Fruit Wine Making

Tayo na at tumagay na, Merrymaking with fruit wines

Contrary to common belief, local wine making and drinking are as old as our folklores are. 

Age, social standing, and cultural traditions were not determinants of how often or how much one can drink then. But, circumstance, social occasions, indeed, are. There is always that one great story to toast for and be merry about.  

And if some in Europe are more into beer-drinking, local Pinoys are into local fruit wines.  Thus, lomboy from duhat, bahalina, or red wine from coconut, banana wine, and pineapple wine are quite far in their spread, albeit regional in their scope.

A product made from the fermentation of the juice, not all wines, therefore, are from grapes alone. The primary difference between grape wines and fruit wines is that the former is produced at grape vineyards, which require a specific atmosphere and cultivable land.

The other difference is that grape wines, such as red wine, complements western cuisines, whereas, fruit wines complement spicy food cuisines, or in local parlance, ‘pulutan’ or finger foods.

This must be why fruit wines, albeit technically classified as table wine because of their low alcohol content, are consumed as a social drink by Pinoys.

Other things are going for fruit wines, however, such as health benefits, style and brand appeal, characteristic fragrance and mouthfeel, and the ability to fit any cuisine, which attract customers to consume various types of fruit wines. These are what the global wine market has witnessed – a steady growth over the years valued at USD354.7 billion in 2018 and projected to grow 21 percent by 2023 to value over USD429 billion.

Based on fruit type, the fruit wine market is segmented into a grape Riesling (white wine grape variety), chardonnay (green-skinned grape variety), pinot gris (white wine grape variety), sauvignon blanc (green-skinned grape variety), strawberry, apple, pear, pineapple, cherry, and others.

In terms of wine grade, the fruit wine market is segmented into distilled, semi-distilled, and fermented.

ITDI shares four basic steps in fruit wine processing, namely, extraction, fermentation, aging, and clarification. It explored wine making using duhat, coconut, banana, and pineapple. 

Banana is grown year-round; pineapple, from February to August; and duhat, from March to July. Coconuts are tapped for wine making while trees are young and nuts are green. These production periods allow wine processors their pick of the fruit and season. 

Fruit Wine Making is Series No. 35 of ITDI’s livelihood technologies under its “Kitang-kita Na sa TekPinoy.biz Series.”  The online material is free for all and can be accessed at http://bit.ly/ITDILivelihoodSeries.

Parties can request for online techno demonstration of technologies included in the series. 

For particulars, write or call: Ms. Nelia Elisa C. Florendo Chief Science Research Specialist Technological Services Division Industrial Technology Development Institute  DOST Complex, Bicutan  Taguig City 1631, Metro Manila  Tel. No.: (02) 8837-2071 Local 2265 

(AMGuevarra \\S&T Media Service)

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